TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Your Pit Crew

Work with the people around you in your body transformation journey.

Nothing worth doing can be done alone.

Is your personal support team fully staffed?

Look for ways that you can incorporate health, fitness, and good nutrition into your daily interactions with the people you know and love.

Along the way, you might have to have some tough, honest conversations about what you need. You might have to negotiate some changes in your household routines.

But you’ll probably find that most people are rooting for you and want you to be healthier and happier.

Team recruitment 101

The more people you recruit for your team, the better your chances of succeeding in your coaching journey will be.

Look for opportunities everywhere. Be creative. Have fun.

No matter how you do this:

  • Ask for help if you need it. (Yes, that can be hard.)
  • Be patient, but persistent. Not everyone will come around to your new healthy habits right away. That’s normal.
  • Figure out what you need to be your best self, and ask for it. You need to put your own oxygen mask on first before helping others.
  • Focus on what you can control. You can’t control other people. You can only be the boss of you. You’re in charge of your actions and your attitude, and you can do lots of things to improve your environment.
  • Look for small adjustments rather than a complete overhaul. You don’t have to dump all your non-gym-going friends or insist your family eat only kale with you. Instead, look for little “boosts”, like swapping child care with another parent for an hour so you can get out for a workout, or meeting a neighbor for an early-morning lap around the park.
  • Keep the communication lines open. Talk things through. Negotiate. Ask for what you need.
  • Solve problems creatively. Look for shared goals (like a healthy family, or spending time together) and win-win outcomes.

How could you connect with the people around you via health and fitness?

For instance:

  • Try movement meetups. Book “activity dates” with friends, whether that’s a simple walk in the park, a longer hike, a trip to the indoor climbing gym, or any other way to get physical together. Join a group fitness class — even if you don’t know the people there, you’re bonding over shared sweat.
  • Play. Kick or throw a ball around in the yard. Play tag or road hockey. Toss a Frisbee to your dog. Get on the playground with your kids. It doesn’t have to be fancy.
  • Cook together. Share meal prep with your partner (sibling, parent, roommate, etc.). Often picky eating kids will become more open to new tastes and foods if they’ve been involved in preparing those foods. Little ones can mash potatoes or avocado for guacamole, set the table, wash vegetables, peel tangerines or boiled eggs, tear up lettuce for salads, and do many other small tasks in the kitchen.
  • Take your kids grocery shopping. Talk about foods. Let them pick out a vegetable that they like. Read labels together. Try a new food together. Visit a farmers’ market.
  • Eat together. Share a meal with someone, whether that’s sitting outside on a sunny day with coworkers, or sitting on the floor with your kid eating carrot sticks.
  • Involve the household in planning. People are more likely to get on board if they feel included. If you share a household with other people, get them involved in collectively planning menus and making food choices.
  • Include activity in your outings and vacations. Whether it’s walking around Disneyland or a bike ride to the beach, look for destinations with healthy food options and ways to stay moving together.

You might have your own ideas about how you could work with the people around to help you make healthier choices, keep moving, and be a little more consistent in your practices.

Find small ways to build health and wellness into your social interactions, and keep trying.

Write in Your Journal

Who are your cheerleaders and helpers in your social network?

What parts of your social network foster healthy living?

How could you build these connections further, and/or do more of this good stuff?