TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Who’s Your Farmer?

Where can you go to find nourishing, fresh foods that are easy on your wallet?

Where can you go to find nourishing, fresh foods that are easy on your wallet?

Can you identify the foods below?

Stumped? You’re looking at:

  • asparagus
  • Brussels sprouts
  • coffee cherries (which contain the coffee beans)
  • cacao pods (which contain cacao beans that eventually become chocolate)

Who’s your farmer?

If you’re already buying fresh, whole foods at your local grocery store, that’s a great start.

If you found the picture quiz challenging, you could consider spending more quality time with your local farmer or Jamie Oliver.

Many common fresh foods we love travel a long, long way to get to us. Sometimes that can’t be helped. Unless you live in western Africa or South America, you probably don’t have coffee or cacao growing in nearby.

Other times, though, we do have fresh, local foods available. If you’re lucky, you have the farmers’ market.

Why shop at a farmers’ market? Why buy seasonally? Why buy locally?

It’s often cheaper

Compared with the rest of the developed world, North Americans spend relatively less on their food. In part, because we don’t often prioritize buying high-quality foods.

Luckily, when you buy in season, you can often get great high-quality foods for less, maybe dirt cheap (pun intended).

The quality is better

Ever wonder why tomatoes in the supermarket in winter look and taste like pink softballs?

It’s because they are genetically modified to be tough enough for mechanical picking. In other words, they’re picked unripe, shipped thousands of miles, then artificially ripened using ethylene gas.

Now imagine picking a plump red tomato off the vine in late summer — it’ll be juicy, sweet and delicious and bursting with valuable nutrients.

You support small family farmers

Most farms in North America are small farms.

Most make less than $25,000 a year. In fact, in the US, the number of farms earning less than $10,000 a year grew by 118,000 from 2002 to 2007.

Often, the folks who keep us fed find it difficult to put food on their own tables.

Buying fresh, local food helps you get and stay lean and healthy by eating nutritiously.

It helps you get high quality, tasty foods.

And it helps your local community and economy.

Win-win.

Start foraging

Do you have a local farmer’s market?

If you do… For a challenge, visit that farmers’ market and purchase all the food you need for one day’s worth of eating. Get fruits, veggies, lean meats, grains, eggs, or whatever fits into your plan.

Do your best to stock up on all locally grown stuff. No mangoes unless you live in Hawaii.

For help finding your neighborhood market …

You’ll get to know the folks who bring you your food and learn insider tips.

If the weather’s still cold where you live, you can also:

  1. Look for an indoor market in your area.
  2. Use the links to locate farms or other stores in your area that sell foods directly from local suppliers.
  3. Ask your grocery store manager to start stocking more local foods.

Download this handy checklist as a reminder of what to look for.

View attachment

Seasonal Eating Guide

PDF