TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

What Else To Track In Your Food Journal

A few more important things to include in your food journal to help you get the best results.

Go beyond the basics.

The core basics of food journaling are tracking:

  1. What are you eating?
  2. How much are you eating?
  3. How are you eating?
  4. When are you eating?

Then, maybe …

  1. Why are you eating?

There are even more options to track. Eating choices are complex, involving a huge range of factors from all dimensions of deep health.

For example, variables that are,

  • Physical
  • Emotional
  • Mental
  • Relational
  • Environmental
  • Existential

If it’s useful for you and your goals, try using a food journal for even deeper self-awareness, by tracking measures like,

  • Environmental: Where are you?
  • Relational: Who are you with?
  • Physical: Are the foods you’re eating a fit for your body?

These things can help you identify “triggers” that lead to overeating, missed meals, or streaks of awesomeness.

Where are you eating?

Are you in a fancy restaurant? Eating over the kitchen sink? Sitting in your office lunchroom?

Which places help your healthy eating lifestyle? Which places help you slow down and pay attention? Which places don’t?

Keeping records of where you eat can sometimes be as important as what you eat.

With whom are you eating?

Are you with your family? By yourself? With clients? Co-workers?

The people with whom you surround yourself as you eat can influence your food choices. Notice who supports your healthy practices, and who might be intentionally or unintentionally disrupting them.

Jotting down a note about “supportive” eating partners or “challenging” eating partners can help you decide if you really want to go to lunch with Kathy or Bob.

“Every time I go out with Kathy, she criticizes me and I want to eat more, just to spite her.”

“Bob always has some great recipe tips. I’m gonna hit him up for some ideas over lunch.”

Important: While they’re influential, it’s not actually Kathy or Bob to blame for eating choices. You can’t control what a dining companion thinks, does, or says.

You can only control what you think, do, or say.

You can use challenging eating situations as a chance to practice determination for your values and goals, while being accepting of differences.

Practice taking care of what you want and need, even when the situation is challenging.

How do you feel before, during, and after?

Some foods may not make you feel very good physically, especially if you have a food intolerance.

For instance, if you don’t digest dairy well, you might be feeling bloated and gassy an hour after that “healthy” cottage cheese.

You might not notice these connections right away. Especially if you’re rushin’ being busy. It’s easy for feelings to take a back seat.

Good record-keeping lets you remember to be aware, spot the patterns, and eventually change them.

“Hmm . . . On Tuesday I was stressed about work and then skipped two whole meals in the middle of my day. Note to self: Watch out for work triggers. And have healthy snacks on hand at work for when things get busy.”