TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

How To Gain Weight Fast

Probably what not to do.

Here’s how to get the opposite of what you want.

Eating slowly aids digestion, calms nerves, and makes food feel more satisfying.

That also means losing weight while enjoying life more. Nice.

So what’s wrong with eating fast?

Below is a cautionary “Opposite Day” tale from Dr. JB, a former skinny guy who wanted to put on as much weight as quickly as possible.

How to gain weight as quickly as possible

By Dr. John Berardi

“When I was a young, dumb, skinny guy I was desperate to put on weight. Of course, I wanted to gain as much muscle as possible. But I wasn’t afraid to gain fat, either.

Really, I just wanted to look and feel huge and powerful.

So I trained like crazy in the gym. And I did every ridiculous thing I could think of to gain weight, which was no small feat since I was an 18 year old full of hormones and a raging metabolism.

One strategy my friends and I came up with was based on an idea I learned about in nutrition class.

My instructor taught us that our “satiety mechanisms” kicked in about 20 minutes after we started a meal.

No matter how much we ate during the first 20 minutes of starting a meal, we wouldn’t feel satisfied or even full until we hit the magical satiety time.

Of course, in nutrition class, our teacher told us that’s why many people overeat: they eat too much during the first 20 minutes, thinking they’re not full. Then, 20 minutes later, they feel “overfull” and guilty.

However, if they’d only slowed down, their bodies’ natural satiety mechanisms would have kicked in to put on the brakes. (Remember that: You can and will feel full if you just slow down. The body’s natural signals will do the work for you. You don’t have to overthink it.)

Ah-ha! For me and my weight-gain-obsessed friends, speed gobbling became a new eating strategy. We’d try to trick our satiety mechanisms by eating as much food as we could, as fast as we could, before we felt full.”

“We even went so far as to throw eating parties where all our weightlifting friends would come over to binge. (Yeah, we were cool like that.) We’d put on loud, fast-paced music and speed-eat, trying to pack in a few thousand calories within the first 20 minutes of a meal.

Sounds ridiculous, I know. But it worked. I gained about 70 pounds in two years.

Which brings me to the moral: if you’re trying to gain weight, eat as much as you can as fast as you can.

Of course, if you’re trying to lose weight, do the opposite.

Slow down. Enjoy your food. Stay “checked in”. Nibble for the first 20 minutes of your meal until your satiety mechanism kicks in.

You’ll feel more physically and mentally satisfied with less food. Your stomach will thank you.

Best of all, you’ll start to lose weight. (Think of it as practice just in case you get invited to have high tea with the Queen of England.)”