TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Go Ahead, Make a Mistake

Your food journal is just a tool. It’s not your self-worth. Miss-step, and track that, too.

As you gather data about your eating habits, you may discover things that need improvement.

After looking through a day of eating in your food journal, you may discover some things that need improvement.

Once we don our researcher’s specs and look at our food journal with “new eyes”, we may realize that while we know what to do, we may not be doing it as consistently as we need to in order to see results.

Most people don’t like feeling like they’re “making mistakes”. We might feel embarrassed or guilty, or like we’ve failed.

Which brings us to a very important point . . .

You are not your journal.

Your journal is something you do. A tool you can use. Not something you are.

You own this tool. It doesn’t own you. A food record is data collection, and you’re the scientist.

The data aren’t “good” or “bad”, and neither are you.

Data just is.

Skipped two meals yesterday? Overate to compensate? Missed your protein? Just facts. And it’s totally OK.

Mistakes are your friends.

When you make mistakes, you learn valuable information…

  • about yourself.
  • about specific situations in your life.
  • about triggers and automatic patterns.
  • about what you might need and want to change.

Precisely because of those mistakes, you have crucial insight that you can now use to change your behavior.

Cool. Thanks, mistakes!

Here’s a strange experiment to try, if you want to …

Make a mistake on purpose.

Go ahead. Make a mistake. Make lots.

Eat something “bad”. Make a “dumb” choice.

Make a mistake that’s familiar to you. Or make a fresh one. Your call.

Make that mistake. Then record it.

And see what happens.

For example, notice and write down how your body and brain feel when you eat something that doesn’t suit you.

Notice how this “mistake” changes your future behavior. Or your cravings.

We don’t learn by trying to be “perfect”.

Trying to be perfect could actually be making you worse.

Instead, we learn by letting ourselves take risks, asking questions and actively seeking improvement.

Why is this choice a “mistake” for you? Why is this a “bad choice” for you?

How can you transform the critical information from that mistake into future action?

Look for bright spots too.

Making mistakes is awesome. Try it today.

Look for what you’re doing well.

  • What is a little easier for you now?
  • Where are you succeeding?
  • What’s a small victory you had recently?

How can you do more of that?

Data = your action plan.

Every piece of data you collect is an opportunity to take a positive step forward.

Every “mistake” is another signpost directing you along the road of your coaching journey.

Go on, make mistakes. Take risks.

Get comfortable with “screwing up”.

“Failure” is just feedback—information that you can use to make a future decision better.

Every success shows you what to do more of, and where you’re already doing well.

Stay aware. Record it all. To your body, there are no secrets.

Then act based on what you know to be true.

Because that’s the only way to truly get better.

  • Find what you are doing right . . . and do more of it
  • Find what you could improve . . . face it honestly and with kindness . . . and take action as soon as possible.