TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Defining Your Food Continuum

Instead of focusing on “good” or “bad” foods, try to make your choices just a little bit better.

Rather than foods being black or white, “good” or “bad”…

  • Some foods feel good and work well for you. They add health, boost your performance, improve your recovery, and/or help your body do its job. (Better.)
  • Some foods don’t feel good and don’t work well for you. They take away health, impair your performance, and/or disrupt your body’s natural rhythms. (Worse.)

It’s not “all-or-nothing”. There’s no “best” or “perfect” food or meal. There are no rules or “shoulds”.

Instead, choices are always relative, better or worse, depending on the situation.

The main goal is to make choices that are just a little bit better, as often as possible.

Defining your continuum

What criteria are most important to you, in context of your lifestyle and goals?

Nutritional quality considerations are for foods that are:

  • minimally-processed, whole foods
  • nutrient-dense
  • single-ingredient or high-quality ingredient foods

Deep health considerations are for foods that:

  • interact well with your body, and make you feel the way you want to feel
  • are easily accessible to you
  • you like and taste good
  • help you feel connected
  • support your values and identity
  • move you towards your goals

“Better” is situational

What’s “better” in a specific context? Why?

Each situation will come with its own unique set of criteria. Your continuum of better to worse will probably be highly dependent on your environment.

A choice you make in an airport might be different than a choice in a restaurant, or at home.

The point of the game isn’t to always have perfect choices. The more important point is to understand why.

Even if the criteria are flexible, with the clarity and certainty of what those decision-making principles are, you can make your choices conscious and purposeful, rather than random, accidental, or “I dunno”.

Knowing that there’s no absolute right or wrong can easily feel scary or disorienting. Understanding your own underlying why is what affords for confidence in every choice.


Write In Your Journal

Name one food you consider “unhealthy” or “bad.”

What’s one way to improve this food to make it a little bit “healthier?”

Why would that improvement make your food “healthier”?