TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Create A Food Safety System

Making sure your environment supports you.

What do you do when you first get into a car?

Hopefully, you put your seatbelt on.

You know that if you were to hit something at full speed, you couldn’t possibly brace yourself against the dashboard enough to save yourself. You’re going too fast, and the force is too strong.

Without that seatbelt, a crash would not end well. It will probably be painful. Recovery will be grim.

So, no problem. You click the seatbelt, and forget about it.

You go on your merry way. Safely. Without worrying about having to suddenly bench press the dashboard.

The same idea applies to your daily practices.

It’s common to live life at at full speed, whizzing through decision after decision after decision.

We’re busy. We’re tired. We’re rushed.

We’re focused on layers and layers of responsibilities… work, kids, school, traffic, that email from the boss… There’s an endless list of potential worries to be filing and settling. The worries and responsibilities fight for attention.

It’s like the scenery zipping past our car as we navigate the madness of highway traffic. After making decisions like crazy, at the end of the day, brains are exhausted.

That feeling of a mad rush of responsibilities is can often be when we feel like we “lose control”, drifting lanes, veering off the road onto rumblestrips.

That’s normal.

Create your trusted “safety system”.

We might think that we “need more willpower” in order to change to maintain healthy practices.

Although willpower and motivation are great things, a trusted safety system is more reliable than willpower. A trusted safety system comes in the form of daily routines and your environment.

Often, decisions are dictated by the environment, and have a lot less to do with willpower.

If food is around you, you’ll probably want to eat it.

That can work in your favor, if healthy food is nearby and easy to prep. Or, that can work against you, if unhealthy food is within arm’s reach.

Make it easier by using your surroundings to your advantage.

Often, decisions are dictated by the environment, and have a lot less to do with “willpower”.

Creating a “safety system”, we ask our surroundings to help us make the right choices… without having to think so much about it. Click the seatbelt, and you’re done.

Make it easier by using your surroundings to your advantage.

Create a food safety system. Create surroundings that make it easy to make choices that support your goals, without having to think so much about too many other options. Click the seatbelt, and you’re done.

Keep healthy stuff near you and convenient. Make it easier to make the choice that aligns with your goals.

For example, you can try:

  • Having ready-to-go fruits and vegetables on hand, such as baby carrots or cherry tomatoes.
  • Packing your workout clothes (or a healthy lunch) the night before. In the morning, it’s grab and go.

Another simple way to do this is to stick a couple of environmental cues together: Add a new cue to a familiar routine.

For instance, you already go to the bathroom. If you want to drink more water, try leaving a water glass by the bathroom sink. Now, going to the bathroom is your cue to have a glass of water. Almost no memory work required.

Keep unhealthy stuff away from you and inconvenient. Make it more difficult (or irritatingly labor-intensive) to make a poor choice.

For example:

  • Keep foods that you don’t want to eat out of the house, if possible. When the late-night munchies hit, it’ll seem like a lot more work to get up and go to the store.
  • Tell someone else about the healthy choices you plan to make, to keep yourself accountable. It’s a lot harder to go back on a promise to someone else.

When you look for ways to make things easier, something else is doing all the work for you–your environment. What a relief!

Keep paying attention to your environment today.

How do the people, things, and daily routines around you affect your decisions?

Notice and name what affects your choices.

No need to change anything today, just observe.