TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Cooking With Healthy Fats

How to get the most from your healthy fats in the kitchen.

Choose the right fat for the job.

Because of the chemical makeup of healthy fats, not all are ideal for cooking.

Some go bad when they’re heated, or have a low smoke point: the temperature at which they’ll start smoking, smelling, tasting nasty and losing nutritional benefits.

Better for high heat

For very high-heat cooking, such as searing meats, try:

  • clarified butter (butter with the milk solids strained out) or ghee
  • grapeseed oil
  • avocado oil

Better for medium heat

For medium-heat cooking jobs like sautéing or simmering, try:

  • regular butter
  • coconut oil
  • extra-virgin olive oil

A tiny bit of beef tallow, pork fat, or chicken also adds a ton of flavor to sautéing.

Plus, these fats are also heat-stable.

Don’t cook with these.

For things like salad dressings, which stay cold or room temperature, try cold-pressed nut and seed oils, such as:

  • hemp seed oil
  • pumpkin seed oil
  • walnut oil
  • hazelnut oil
  • flax seed oil

These oils usually have a distinctive flavor and color, and add a nice taste.

They also have a lower smoke point and can be nutritionally degraded with heat.

Fat cooking tricks and tips

Avocados You can often substitute avocado for other types of fat in baking.

Flavored oils If you’re sautéing garlic and onions as part of another dish, use some extra olive oil to do so. Then, before you move on to the next step of your recipe, drain the excess oil out into a jar. Now you have flavored olive oil. Store it in the fridge and use it to pump up the flavor of something else, such as a salad dressing.

You can also make other types of flavored oils with fresh herbs, spices, citrus, etc.

Coconut If dairy doesn’t agree with you, but you still like a creamy texture in some dishes (such as mashed potatoes or soups), try substituting coconut milk.

Nuts and nut butters If you have a food processor or a robust blender, try making:

  • Your own tahini (sesame seed) paste and your own hummus
  • Your own peanut or other nut/seed butter

Make your own salad dressing

It’s quick and easy to make a delicious salad dressing. In a jar with a lid, pour in:

  • 1 part oil of your choice
  • 1 part acid (such as wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, etc.)

Now you can add flavorings such as:

  • chopped fresh or dried herbs
  • a pinch of salt and pepper if you like
  • chopped fresh or dried garlic (flakes or powder)

You can also add something that will emulsify the oil and acid (in other words, make it stay blended), such as:

  • regular or Dijon mustard
  • yogurt

Put the lid on the jar and shake it up. (You can also, of course, whip this up in a blender.)

And your dressing is done.

There are endless variations on this basic idea.

Once you get the hang of this and start finding what you like, you may never buy bottled dressing again.

Omega-3 oil

If you’re considering supplementing with omega-3 oil, one credible brand is Barleans, especially their Swirl Lime. It tastes like cheesecake.