TOTAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM

Plan and Prep Your Meals
Plan and Prep Your Meals
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Do a Mind-Body Scan
Practice De-Stressing
Practice De-Stressing
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Create and Use a Sleep Ritual
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Use a Targeted Recovery Strategy
Think on a Continuum
Think on a Continuum
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Mostly Whole Foods
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Eat Protein and Colorful Plants
Practice 80% Full
Practice 80% Full
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Practice Your Fitness Mission
Maintain Progress
Maintain Progress
Deep Health
Deep Health

Bad Memories Are Good News

Knowing more about your food intake and your eating decisions makes you more self-aware.

Pop quiz!

Get out your #2s.

What did you eat for dinner three days ago?

Go ahead, write it down. We’ll wait.

Hmmm … I think there were carrots … and some green stuff … maybe … no, wait, was there an apple?

If you’re having trouble remembering, don’t worry. You still pass. You’re normal.

Most people can’t remember what they’ve eaten after only a short time, even within an hour.

Then, when we do recall from memory, those memories are often drastically skewed. The memories are unreliable, even if you swear they’re right.

The common tendency is to think we eat less and move more than we truly do.

Research that compares people’s recall of their food to what they actually ate shows that people can under-estimate their intake by up to 1000 calories a day.

That’s human nature. We’re pretty bad remember-ers.

That’s why we don’t rely on memory. We have technology. We write stuff down.

Bad memories are good news.

If you’re frustrated because “nothing is working”, there’s good news: You might be wrong.

In other words …

You might simply be forgetting some important factors. Once you become more aware, those gaps may be easy to adjust.

For example, let’s say it feels like you hardly eat anything, but can’t lose weight. How frustrating!

Then, once you record everything you eat and drink for several days, you notice things like:

  • An extra glass of wine with dinner.
  • Picking off the kids’ plates as you clear the table.
  • Your takeout coffee drink actually has 400 calories.
  • What you think is a one-tablespoon serving of peanut butter is actually more like a quarter-cup.

These little things add up. And, little things can be more easily changed and improved. Especially more easily than big vague nonsensical things.

Awareness brings change

Knowing more about your food intake and your eating decisions makes you more self-aware.

More self-awareness means you are in charge.

Start with observation

At first, don’t analyze, judge, or react emotionally. Just simply collect data, and observe.

Be unflinchingly honest and keep it real.